Thursday, October 27, 2005

If they'd wanted everybody to use it they wouldn't have called it Public Transport

The first thing Wayne Mapp did in his new role as person I make fun of? Criticise the Human Rights Commission for playing an advocacy role. What had the Human Rights Commission done that very day? Released a report on reducing barriers to disabled people using public transport.

Well I'm so relieved we have a National Spokesperson to stop the crazy politically correct idea that everyone should be able to ride on public transport.

So having fulfilled my new role as Shadow Minister for ridiculing Wayne Mapp, I will move to the substantive issue.

In Wellington they do have some kneeling buses, but on most routes they can't guarantee when they'll come. You might as well not have any at all. Who would go to the bus stop and wait on the off chance one of the buses that came in the next few hours might be able to take you to where you wanted to go (but no guarantees about getting back)? I'm pretty sure none of the trains are wheelchair accessible.

So if you have mobility problems in Wellington (not the best city in the world to have mobility problems in, that's for sure) then you better own a car or stay at home. Obiviously along with those mobility stickers there also comes magic powers against ever increasing petrol costs.

Of course there's not much to do except rant and rave, unless we re-nationalise public transport. Then as well as making public transport accessable we could make it free.

As I said here disbility isn't just abour someone's body, it's about an interaction between their body and society. The decision that someone is going to be 'disabled' when it comes to public transport is made by the transport companies, not by your body.

3 comments:

  1. How about Alan Duff's *useful* suggestion that we "give them all taxi chits instead?" He seemed to think that would be more economically sound!!!

    He also said we shouldn't modify buildings to be wheelchair capable on the "off-chance" someone in a wheelchair needs to use the building.

    I'd like to cut off his legs and see how HE likes it.

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  2. i found it highly ironic that Duff was also opposed to compulsory wearing of seatbelts - we'd probably have more disabled people if they were voluntary! fools.

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  3. Esther2:44 pm

    Hey Capitalism girl, have you read this:

    http://www.publicaddress.net/default,2655.sm#post

    Funny.

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